Number 42, Jackie Robinson!

Written by, Melony F. Carter
Picture: Creative Commons
Date: February 5, 2019

With 137 home runs, a batting average of .311 and a record of 29 bases stolen during his overall baseball career as a First, Second and Third base runner, Jackie Robinson (Number 42) played for the Brooklyn Dodgers, who could deny his prolific talent as an athlete.

Education and Career
First attending school at Pasadena Junior College in 1938, Jackie would soon be transferred to UCLA in 1939-1940. According to CMG Worldwide, “at UCLA, Jackie became the first athlete to win varsity letters in four sports: baseball, basketball, football and track. In 1941, he was, [selected for] …the All-American football team.”

Soon after he would go on to join the U.S. Army from 1942-1945 to become a second Lieutenant. Though facing racial discrimination, he received an honorable discharge.
Known for his good reputation and sportsmanship like demeanor Robinson according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, “he was” purposely chosen to help break the color barriers that where established during the 20th century. Mr. Robinson, was to play “as an infielder and outfielder for [the National League Brooklyn] Dodgers from 1947 through 1956.”

Overcoming the Pressure
As time progressed Mr. Robinson faced many challenges on the field like hateful name calling, bottles being tossed at him, ugly commentary, death threats, as-well-as strikes and the Jim Crow laws. But with the love and support of friends and family he was able to overcome his many trials to receive accolades making Rookie of the Year in 1947, during his first season.

Winning Season
Some of his accomplishments include, winning six league championships and one World Series. Also, in 1949 Jackie was named the league’s Most Valuable Player (MVP). He was recognized for having a .342 batting average. In 1962, as the first black male, Mr. Robinson was recognized in the Baseball Hall of Fame, in Cooperstown, New York.

Shining Talents
As his popularity became widespread, he became a published author of his autobiography entitled, “I Never Had It Made”, actor, starring in his own film in 1950, “The Jackie Robinson Story”, and fashion designer in 1952, introducing a line of men’s fashions in Harlem on 125th street.

Never forgetting his roots, Jackie went on to become an activist for the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) from 1957-1967.

Today in Honor Of
With so many talents, it is undeniable that Mr. Robinson is clearly a shining example of a person determined to make a good change by displaying what it means to persevere whilst contributing to his community, and culture. Today, as a tribute to his many successes we continue to celebrate Number 42, every April 15 on Jackie Robinson Day.

Works Cited
CMG Worldwide. “Jackie Robinson.” About, https://www.jackierobinson.com.
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica. “Jackie Robinson
AMERICAN ATHLETE.” Encyclopaedia Britannica https://www.britannica.com/biography/Jackie-Robinson.